JAPAN: Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture (Spa Resort Hawaiians/ Joban Hawaiian Center)

Joban is one of thirteen zones within Iwaki City located in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. The area was renowned for coal mining which began near the foot of the Abukuma mountains in 1883. By 1944, the Joban Mine was the largest mine in Japan and utilized Allied POWs as laborers. As the coal industry declined in the 1960s, the mine’s vice president, Yutaka Nakamura conceived of an idea to open up a resort taking advantage of the area’s hot springs in an effort to generate income from tourism for the city.

On January 15, 1966, the Joban Hawaiian Center was opened becoming Japan’s first theme park. Over the years, the theme park was upgraded and became a full scale resort. Resultantly, the name was changed to Spa Resort Hawaiians (スパリゾートハワイアンズ) in 1990.   Park attendance reached its peak in the early 1970s where attendance exceeded 1.5 million visitors annually.  Today, it still enjoys a steady influx of visitors and is considered among the top ten most popular “theme parks” in Japan.

The Spa Resort Hawaiians is divided into five areas consisting of: The Water Park, The Spring Park, The Spa Garden Pareo, Edo Jowa Yoichi and Vir Port.

The Water Park comprises the main area of the resort where you will find various indoor pools, water slides and the dance stage. A Hawaiian atmosphere is recreated throughout with pineapple plants and other tropical vegetation. The Spring Park is one of two hot spring areas that is fed by spring water from the Yumoto Onsen. Here you will find co-ed lukewarm indoor pools as well as regular, gender separated hot spring baths where swimsuits are not allowed. The Spa Garden Pareo is a water playground with outdoor pools, deckchairs, Jacuzzis and a sauna (please note that this section is closed during the winter months). Edo Jowa Yoichi is a gender separated, large outdoor bath with an Edo period theme. It is said that this is the largest single outdoor bath in Japan. Finally, Vir Port is where guests can partake in Hawaiian dance lessons, enjoy a massage or facial, or take part in water exercises. The resort also has various restaurants and two hotels: Hotel Hawaiians and Monolith Tower.

However, the park’s most popular attraction is its dance troupe known as the Hula Girls. They were the subject of a 2006 film with the same name.  The film was directed by Sang-il Lee and grossed $9.4 million at the box office!

In March of 2011, the resort sustained heavy damage by the East Japan Earthquake and was forced to close. During the closure, the Hula Girls troupe toured Japan performing at earthquake refugee shelters and other venues. The resort reopened on February 8, 2012 with a much larger stage for the Hula Girls show.

Accessing the resort is relatively easy. There are free hourly shuttle buses to/from Yumoto Station. In addition, the resort provides bus service for its staying guests to/from Tokyo (3 hours) and Yokohama (3.5 hours), free of charge. Please note that advance reservations are required for the latter.

Web page:

http://www.hawaiians.co.jp/english/

Location:

50, Warabidaira, Fujiwaramachi,

Joban, Iwaki-shi,

Fukushima, 972-8326, Japan

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Preview: The Sun Will Rise Again

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The Sun Will Rise Again

ISBN-13: 978-1540747952

Without question World War II was the deadliest war in history. Of the estimated 70 million people killed, 50 to 55 million were civilians.

The United States managed to stay out of the war that was ravaging the rest of the world until the day Imperial Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, “a date which will live in infamy.”

What prompted the Japanese to wage war with the United States? Was the attack really a surprise or was it a carefully orchestrated event by Washington to anger the American public enough to want to go to war?

Did the Japanese truly believe that they would prevail against the military might of the United States? The losses the Japanese military experienced during the Pacific War were unforeseeable. The suffering endured by the Japanese people was unimaginable. 

By the end of World War II, Japan had persevered through 14 years of war. The country lay in ruins and the morale of its people was at an all-time low, but in the land of the rising sun, the sun will rise again. Follow Japan’s journey from vanquished to victorious in this book that details the grim realities of war, politics, racism and blind devotion.

Please also check out my travel guide released in November of 2016, “A Blogger’s Guide To Japan,” available on Amazon.com, Amazon Kindle and CreateSpace eStore: (https://www.createspace.com/6595032)

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Seeking Interview Candidates For Upcoming Book

I have not been posting to my blog very often as of late and the reason is because I have been busy working on my second book.

The new book is on track to be published by Fall 2017.  I am seeking individuals willing to share their stories about the Pacific War.  These stories will be featured in interview format at the end of the book.

The interviews will be conducted via email.

Potential interview candidates include:

(1) Japanese civilians who survived the bombings of Tokyo, Nagasaki or Hiroshima (or their family members).

(2) Former members of the Japanese military (or their family members).

(3) Former members of the 100th/ 442nd Battalions / MIS (or their family members).

(4) Japanese War Brides who traveled to the United States or Australia.

(5) War orphans in Japan (Orphaned either as a result of being mixed race babies/ children of the occupation forces or orphaned due to their parents becoming war casualties.)

Please post a comment, if you are interested in sharing your story.  Thank you for your support.

(Photo: Werner Bischof/ Japan 1951)

New Giveaway: A Blogger’s Guide To Japan (Kindle Edition)

It has been sometime since I sponsored a giveaway contest.  With that being said, I am offering a free Kindle version of my book, “A Blogger’s Guide To Japan” starting today.  One lucky winner will be chosen at random.  Please visit the following link for your chance to win:  Free Kindle Book Giveaway

Remember, the Kindle app is FREE to download and enables you to read the book on various devices including your phone and computer.

Good luck!

(Contest ends: Jul 27, 2017 11:59 PM PDT)

The Odessa Journal: Ukraine’s crossroads of culture

“Isn’t Ukraine dangerous??” a friend of mine recently asked me.

How The Allied Occupation Helped Promote The Popularity Of Tokyo Style Nigiri Sushi

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When the Allied forces arrived in Japan in 1945 for what was to be the seven year military occupation, there was little doubt that the country would be changed forever. However, some traditions were retained in an effort to maintain Japanese culture.  One of these traditions was sushi.

The earliest form of sushi in Japan was called narezushi (salted fish).  Fish was stored in fermented rice for long periods of time without spoiling and provided an important source of protein in the Japanese diet. The sushi we are familiar with today is called nigiri sushi.  It had its origins in Edo (Tokyo). A restaurant owner named Hanaya Yohei is credited with having invented this type of sushi during the 19th century.  The Edo people were known for their busy lifestyle and lack of patience, therefore many fast food businesses began cropping up. Nigiri sushi, which was known as Edomaezushi at the time, was a type of fast food, conveniently shaped to be eaten by hand and no longer reliant on the fermentation process utilized by narezushi.

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While nigiri quickly became the most popular style of sushi in Edo, it did not immediately dominate the sushi landscape as it does today. There were two events which aided the popularity of nigiri sushi outside of Tokyo: one was the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 and the other was the military occupation of Japan in 1945.  The earthquake caused many people to leave Tokyo and return to their hometowns.  Among these were the various sushi chefs who opened restaurants upon returning home and served Edomaezushi to their clientele. In post-war Japan, many sushi shops were forced to close due to the rice rationing at the time and not allowed to reopen.

Eventually it was impressed upon the American Forces General Headquarters that the sushi restaurants should be allowed to reopen as sushi was an important part of Japanese culture.  When the restaurants reopened however, they had to adhere to one strict rule.  That rule was that the patrons were to bring in their own rice rations for the sushi.  One cup of rice was to be used to make ten pieces of sushi hence the nigiri sushi shrunk in size.  In pre-war Japan, nigiri sushi was three times larger.

Eventually the same system was implemented throughout Japan and Tokyo style nigiri became Japan’s predominant form of sushi.

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The Newly Formatted Kindle Edition of “A Blogger’s Guide To Japan” Is Here!

I am happy to announce that the long awaited newly formatted edition of “A Blogger’s Guide To Japan” is finally here!

Product details

  • File Size: 27479 KB
  • Print Length: 477 pages
  • Publication Date: January 31, 2017
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01MRCHE72
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled

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The Kindle App is FREE to download and it enables you to read the book on ANY device including: the Kindle Reader, tablet, smart phone or computer.

The eBook is currently in the Top 50 of Amazon’s Best Seller’s Rank in the Kindle Store.

Order your copy today at: Amazon Kindle Store

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